According to Texas Monthly, the Black-eyed Pea, a once booming Dallas-based food chain from '75, is on the brink of becoming a culinary ghost.

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Its story is tragic as the number of Black-eyed Pea Texas locations nosedived from 130 outlets at its peak to a lone ranger in Arlington.

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Robert Sweet, a die-hard fan, treks 25 miles for those "dangerously good" pork chops.
Although even his loyalty wavers at times, swapping his cherished chops for a salmon dish.

The uninitiated may not grasp the tragedy of this dwindling former empire. But imagine walking in for a cozy chicken potpie only to find bankruptcy signs. How's that for a potpie plot twist?

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Enter Cheri Coffin, the unwavering owner.

A server since her teens, she's the beating heart of this final outpost, fielding daily calls of disbelief. A defiant billboard screams "OMG Yes, We're Still Open," a tribute to her tenacity.

Every ring of the phone brings a caller stunned and thrilled that they can still get a slice of nostalgia.

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Jennifer Peyton, the manager, reassures them: the old favorites are here, no knock-offs.

Come fill your coolers with pot roasts, pork chops, and shepherd’s pie, just like the golden days.

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So here's the dish: the story of the last Black-eyed Pea in Texas doesn't end here, because apparently a mix of food nostalgia, unwavering loyalty, and grit to keep tradition alive is making this place run.

In Arlington, TX at least.

I find myself thinking about a 180-mile journey for a bite of those legendary buttery rolls.

Let me know what you think at nico@klaq.com

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