Minneapolis, MN (KROC-AM News) - Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison this afternoon announced charges have been filed against three former Minneapolis police officers accused of being involved in the death of George Floyd.

Ellison says Thomas Lane, J. Alexander Keung, and Tou Thao are facing charges of aiding and abetting second-degree felony murder. Ellison also announced he has amended the criminal complaint against former officer Derek Chauvin to include a second-degree felony murder. Chauvin was previously charged with third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter stemming from Floyd's death, which occurred last Monday while Chauvin was pressing one of his knees against the 46-year-old man's neck.

The other former officers were participants in the tragic incident, which was captured on a viral cell phone video that has sparked both peaceful and violent protests around the world. All four men were fired by the Minneapolis Police the following day.

Earlier today, the attorney for the family of George Floyd issued a statement about the arrests and new charges in the case. The Floyd family and attorney Benjamin Crump spoke today during a visit to the Minneapolis street corner where George Floyd died and an ever-growing memorial is located.

This is a bittersweet moment for the family of George Floyd. We are deeply gratified that Attorney General Keith Ellison took decisive action in this case, arresting and charging all the officers involved in George Floyd’s death and upgrading the charge against Derek Chauvin to felony second-degree murder. This is a significant step forward on the road to justice, and we are gratified that this important action was brought before George Floyd’s body was laid to rest. That is a source of peace for George’s family in this painful time. Attorney General Ellison has informed the family that his office will continue to investigate and will upgrade the charges to first-degree murder if the evidence supports it.

The arrests and prosecution of all four former officers have been a key demand of protest organizers in the Twin Cities.