How much bologna is too much? Don't ask the owner of this car because they might say the limit doesn't exist. However, at U.S. Customs and Border protection there is a limit- zero. Bologna containing pork products is banned from entering the U.S. because of the potential for animal diseases.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers had the makings of a super sandwich on Wednesday morning when a woman attempted to smuggle 23 rolls of Mexican bologna across the Santa Teresa Port of Entry in New Mexico. The woman failed to declare the deli meat initially, but when selected for secondary inspection she admitted that she had bologna hidden under the floor mats. All together, the bologna added up to 227 pounds.

The driver, who is a U.S. citizen from Sunland Park, NM,  was fined $1,000 and the contraband was destroyed- I highly doubt that it was used to make sandwiches, though. You may be thinking to yourself: "of all things, why would bologna be such a big deal?" according to the CBP website:

"The products CBP prevent from entering the United States are those that would injure community health, public safety, American workers, children, or domestic plant and animal life, or those that would defeat our national interests. Sometimes the products that cause injury, or have the potential to do so, may seem fairly innocent. But, as you will see from the material that follows, appearances can be deceiving."

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Appearances can certainly be decieving. If you'll remember a couple of weeks ago, CBP at the Cincinnati seized 44 pounds of "Frosted Flakes" that were not coated in sugar but rather booger sugar, a.k.a. cocaine! For a complete list of what's prohibited and restricted from bringing across the border, click here.

 

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