There seems to be a bit of confusion recently surrounding a group calling themselves the "Alt-right." They were the group that was behind the now-infamous "Unite the Right" rally in Charlottesville, Va.

Now, you might be thinking to yourself, "Well, I'm a conservative. I even voted for Trump. That doesn't mean I'm a racist."

Make no mistake: The Alt-right is a white supremacist organization. They seldom slip up and actually say "White Supremacy" but they use other language that means the same thing. Racial realist, ethno-nationalism, neo-nativist ... this is the same old racist message of the KKK being presented to the American people in fancy new wrapping paper.

Unfortunately, for the alt-righters, that wrapping paper is transparent. People of good will and good faith, democrats and republicans alike, can see right through it. If you align yourself with the fascists in the Alt-Right you are either: naive about what they really stand for (a position that is becoming increasingly hard to believe) OR ... you yourself are a bigot.

To be clear, I'm not saying that if you're a conservative or a republican that you're a bigot. You know which republicans came out quickly and in a full-throated way against the Alt-right after Chalottesville? Other than Trump, ALMOST ALL OF THEM. This isn't about being anti-republican or anti anything other than anti-hate groups. If to you that sounds a little too much like an attack on the current occupant of the White House, that's a question you'll have to answer for yourself.

It's had to believe but back in 1947 ... more than a decade before the Civil Rights Act of 1964 ... the U.S. War Department put out a public service short film about how Americans should respond to the kind of rhetoric we're now hearing from the "Alt-Right."

You can watch the full version here. Below is a shorter scene that really hits the Alt-Right square in the jaw.